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make them at home

Le 21 mai 2014, 10:44 dans Humeurs 0

I am likely the last person in New York City to learn about Blue Sky Bakery muffins, and it’s all my fault because I wasn’t paying attention. Why would you, really? Most coffee shops don’t sell muffins worth noting. You can only audition so many flavorless, greasy, tight-crumbed, massive metallic-tasting muffins before not even looking in bakery cases when you go in for your morning fix. Four year-olds, however, are not suspicious — they are insistent. So, one morning over spring break (something you dread when you’re in preschool, live for in high school and college, and I’m sorry to admit, lightly dread again as a parent), when I tried to make the most of our more leisurely mornings with excursions, we got in the terrible habit of splitting one of their fruit-filled bran muffins each morning and by the end of the week, we were so addicted that I had to make them at home cloud backup.

It’s no surprise that a bakery that takes their muffins as seriously as Park Slope’s Blue Sky does produces such excellent ones. In a video on Serious Eats, founder Erik Goetze notes that “most bakery muffins are made by just going through the motions, either in an industrial factory-type muffin-making operation or whether people are making so many things, they cannot focus on what makes a great muffin,” which he outlines as moist, having a nice peak to it and, ideally, straight from the oven when it’s still crisp and crunchy on top, and when opened, a little curl of steam comes out of it Digital Signage.

we are going to be good friends

Le 21 mai 2014, 10:43 dans Humeurs 0

Look, I have no business giving dating advice. Or marital advice. I didn’t, like, scope the scene or learn the rules or think big thoughts about what kind of person would be the right person for me when I walked into a bar 11 years ago and met this guy for a drink. Nevertheless, if you were to try isolate a single trait essential in a life partnership, I think you should look for a person who is pro-whim — that is, encourages you to have whims and pursue them, for better or for worse. Does that sound too abstract? Okay, fine; let me propose instead the Strawberry Rhubarb Pie Bar Test, which should be enlisted as follows. 1. Find a potential mate. 2. Say, “Do I need to good reason to make strawberry-rhubarb pie bars?” 3. If they answer, as mine did on Monday, “Nope. I think they’re always welcome,” you’re probably on the right track. If nothing else, your weekend is about to get tastier.

I’d been daydreaming about a late spring riff on an apple-crisp-in-the-pan bars since I got the One Bowl Baking book last fall. I’m not sure I’ve ever met a pie-like cookie bar I didn’t like, but still, these made me nervous because they seemed so (ewww) wholesome. There are more whole grains than white flour, less sugar and less butter than any other cookie bar I’ve ever made. How could this be good? Silly Deb, I should have just trusted the author implicitly. Yvonne Ruperti is a former Cook’s Illustrated writer, America’s Test Kitchen on-air host and bakery owner, so you could say she knows a few things about baking.

But I love that she didn’t just go for the kind of perfectionism or obsessive, detail-oriented baking you’d expect from someone with her resume. Instead, she wrote the kind of cookbook book that I imagine a lot of people would rather have on their shelves because it’s realistic about the way we really want to bake, that is, no multiple mixing bowls, no mise-en-place and questioning everything, i.e. “Does this really taste worse if the ingredients aren’t sifted?” “So what if I don’t mix the wet ingredients separately?” I mean, don’t you wish every recipe writer would ask these questions before adding to your pile of dirty dishes? And the recipes are for not just stand-bys (basic chocolate layer cake, snickerdoodles and creamy diner-style cheesecake) but clever innovations (hellooo, sweet and salty pretzel crunch cupcakes, we are going to be good friends for warm/ humid climate) too.

These bars, though, they win. They’re too easy and delicious not to make a habit of. You dump your dry ingredients in your baking pan and pour melted butter over them and mix up the mixture until it crumbles. You press most of it in to form a bottom crust, sprinkle diced fruit of your choice, a spoonful of sugar and lemon over it and sprinkle the remaining crumble on top. It’s out of the oven in 35 minutes and, you know, I’d thought these would be ideal for a picnic or pot-luck dessert, or maybe for when it’s our turn to bring snacks into preschool. But I can tell you as of 9:32 this morning that these are ideal breakfast bars, too, with a dollop of plain yogurt on top Korean Skin Care Product.

I think they'll hold up nicely

Le 24 février 2014, 05:26 dans Humeurs 0

I thought a lot about how I might pack for India. A lot. I'm excited about the adventure, and in the days before pulling my suitcase out of the closet I found myself deep inside my own head considering which cameras to bring, which dresses (just 2, maybe 3!), and what food to bring for the flight - SFO to Frankfurt to Delhi. That, my friends, is the one part of the trip I wasn't looking forward to - it's twelve hours to Frankfurt, another seven to Delhi. Here's a peek at how my packing came together pauillac . On the food-for-the-flight front, I've been playing around with a few ideas. No question, these dumplings made the cut, and I ended up packing these millet croquettes for snacking as well - crunchy crusted, basil and kale flecked, I think they'll hold up nicely Multi-touch Board .

One carry-on, one purse - that was the goal. My camera and film take up a chunk of space in my suitcase, and beyond that it's all about cramming things into little pockets and corners. In this shot (clockwise from top-left): lunch canister (new! I stack in layers between sheets of parchment), Love Travel Guides, Kindle (with this & this on it), sunglasses, notebook/phone, my Land camera, business cards.

illet Croquette RecipeHere's a glimpse of how it's coming together into my suitcase. I have room for a few more packs of film, and a pair of ballet flats. But everything else is in there - adapters and camera gear on the left, dresses (top right), toiletries (bottom right), camera and guide book (bottom left) cheap otterbox.

Voir la suite ≫